Nihonryori RyuGin Kaiseki

Top 14 Kaiseki Restaurants in Tokyo

Nihonryori RyuGin Kaiseki

Tokyo kaiseki restaurants are some of the best in Japan. Affordable? Michelin-starred? Halal? Vegetarian? We've got one for you. Read on for our top 14 kaiseki restaurants in Tokyo.

Nihonryori RyuGin Kaiseki

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While the capital is no Kyoto when it comes to kaiseki meals, Tokyo certainly has its fair share of restaurants specialising in this most Japanese of cuisines.

Confused by the terminology? We’ll briefly explain what kaiseki is, then present to you the 14 best kaiseki restaurants in Tokyo.

What is Kaiseki?

Kaiseki (or kaiseki-ryori) is a traditional multi-course Japanese meal with its roots in a variety of different culinary traditions. This includes imperial court cuisine (yusoku-ryori), Buddhist cuisine (shojin-ryori), samurai cuisine (honzen-ryori) and tea ceremony cuisine (cha-kaiseki).

Originally composed of just three courses, kaiseki meals can now constitute upwards of 14 courses, each demonstrating a different aspect of Japanese cooking and always using the freshest seasonal ingredients available. It’s no wonder kaiseki meals can easily fetch 50,000 yen or more per person.

Without further ado, here’s the list (in no particular order):

DEN Tokyo

DEN Tokyo

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Chef Zaiyu Hasegawa adds an interesting twist to classic kaiseki at this Michelin star restaurant. Take DEN’s signature salad, for example. Seemingly innocuous at first glance, upon further inspection, you may be alarmed to note that it’s strewn with ants. Don’t be perturbed, these protein-rich critters are bursting with flavour and complement the salad wonderfully. A more conventional dish may be their succulent DFC (Dentucky Fried Chicken) which even arrives in a cardboard container. Once eaten, you won’t be going back to KFC in a hurry. Complimenting the off-kilter food are the welcoming and jovial staff who really help to make the experience one to savour.

Opening Hours: Mon-Fri 18:00 - 23:30/Sat 17:00 - 22:00 (Closed on Sunday)
Address: Architect House Hall JIA, 2-3-18 Jingumae, Shibuya, Tokyo
Access: Gaienmae Station
Phone Number: 03-6455-5433
Website: DEN
Price: ~15,000 yen

Kien

Kien

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Want a Michelin experience without burning a hole in your wallet? Try Kien. Lunch sets (not the full blown kaiseki meal) on weekdays between 11:30 and 01:00, unbelievably, come in at just 2,000 yen. There are pricier options featuring wagyu beef steak and suppon nabe (softshell turtle hot pot), though Kichi, the cheapest set, is perhaps just as good. For a closer look, check out Kien’s menu.

Opening Hours: Mon-Sat 11:30 - 15:00, 18:00 - 23:00 (Closed on Sunday)
Address: 2-18-8 Akasaka, Minato, Tokyo
Access: Roppongi-Itchome Station
Phone Number: 03-3505-0728
Website: Akasaka Kien
Price: Lunch 1,700 - 8,600 yen/Dinner 12,000 - 15,000 yen

Ryotei Kikunoi

Ryotei Kikunoi

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Ryotei Kikunoi’s main branch in Kyoto has three Michelin stars and its sister branch here in Tokyo is no slouch either. Indeed, it is the proud owner of an only slightly less impressive two Michelin stars. One big factor in the restaurant’s success is the close attention it pays to the seasons, which are reflected not only on the menu but in the interior as well. Let’s face it though, we’re here for the food, of which the spring tai (red sea bream), summer ayu (sweetfish), autumn matsutake (mushrooms) and winter crab are delightful.

If money is tight, Kikunoi does offer the relatively affordable Kodaiji Feast bento lunch for 5,000 yen. This lunch set is a good kaiseki substitute but it will leave you wanting a taste of the real thing.

Opening Hours: Mon-Sat 12:00 - 13:00, 17:00 - 20:30 (Closed on Sunday and 1st and 3rd Monday of each month)
Address: 6-13-8 Akasaka, Minato, Tokyo
Access: Akasaka Station
Phone Number: 03-3568-6055
Website: Akasaka Kikunoi
Price: Lunch 5,000 - 10,000 yen/Dinner 16,000 - 30,000 yen

Kobe Beef Kaiseki 511

Kobe Beef Kaiseki 511

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The star of the show at this kaiseki restaurant is the high-grade A5 beef. To put it in layman’s terms, if regular beef is store brand toilet paper, then A5 beef is Charmin. If a toilet paper analogy doesn’t leave your mouth watering, we don’t know what will. Kobe Beef Kaiseki 511’s complete Kobe beef course comes at a hefty price, however, around 13,800 yen all in. It’s worth every yen, though.

Opening Hours: Mon-Sat 11:30 - 14:30, 18:00 - 23:00 (Closed on Sunday)
Address: Dear Plaza Akasaka B1F, 4-3-28 Akasaka, Minato, Tokyo
Access: Akasaka or Akasaka-mitsuke Station
Phone Number: 03-6685-0511
Website: 511
Price: Lunch 1,800 - 12,300 yen/Dinner 13,800 - 15,00 yen

Tagetsu (日本料理太月)

Tagetsu (日本料理太月)

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After training with the best kaiseki chefs around, Hideo Mochizuki decided to branch out and open his own restaurant in 2013. The result is Tagetsu, a modest but tantalising little restaurant tucked away in an Omotesando basement. Here you’ll be presented with an array of meticulously prepared dishes, all masterminded in-house. One such dish is their ostensibly basic clear soup which is bursting with the flavors of kombu seaweed and dried bonito flakes. Pair your meal with one of their fine Kanagawa sakes for a night to remember.

Opening Hours: Mon-Sat 11:30 - 14:00, 18:00 - 23:00 (Closed on Sunday)
Address: Kita-Aoyama Sekine Building B1F, 3-13-1 Kita-Aoyama, Minato, Tokyo
Access: Omotesando Station
Phone Number: 03-6450-5991
Website: Tagetsu Tabelog / Tagetsu Pocket Concierge [Reservation]
Price: Lunch 9,000 - 12,500 yen/Dinner 21,500 - 40,000 yen

Tokyo Shiba Tofuya Ukai

Tokyo Shiba Tofuya Ukai

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Good news for vegetarians! Under Tokyo Tower you’ll find a chic kaiseki restaurant which specializes in tofu dishes. Though not fully vegetarian, inform Tofuya Ukai’s staff and they’ll be happy to take care of you. The bad news is that it costs an arm and a leg, so perhaps a place to be reserved for special occasions. The views out to a wonderful Japanese garden and koi pond will make it all more the special.

Fortunately for non-vegetarians, the kaiseki meal features fresh sashimi, wagyu beef and a medley of other carnivorous treats. Check out their menu for a closer look.

Opening Hours: Sun-Sat 11:00 - 20:00 (Closed one Monday a month, check their calendar)
Address: 4-4-13 Shibakoen, Minato, Tokyo
Access: Akabanebashi Station
Phone Number: 03-3436-1028
Website: Ukai Shiba
Price: Lunch 5,940 - 7,560 yen/Dinner 10,800 - 16,200 yen

Kanda

Kanda

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Chef Hiroyuki Kanda’s restaurant has held three Michelin stars for just shy of a decade now, so you know he’s doing something right. To find out what, be prepared to get into some serious debt. This place is far from cheap.

Kanda’s five years in France are evident in his cooking, each dish showing off a subtle European twist and ingeniously personalised for every diner. The ingredients, too, are of the highest order: abalone, truffles, Miyazaki beef and fugu (pufferfish) to name but a smattering. As in all good European restaurants, recommendations for wine pairings will be forthcoming from Kanda himself who is also fluent in English and French both.

Opening Hours: Mon-Sat 18:00 - 24:00 (Closed on Sunday)
Address: 3-6-34 Moto-Azabu, Minato, Tokyo
Access: Roppongi Station
Phone Number: 03-5786-0150
Website: Kanda
Price: >20,000 yen

Nihonryori RyuGin

RyuGin

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Nihonryori RuGin is another three-star Michelin joint and one particularly fastidious when it comes to its clientele. If, impressively, you’re under 10 and reading this, sadly you’re unwelcome. Adults don’t get off too easy either, they must abide by the smart-casual dress code (leave your trainers at home) and avoid excessive noise. If you can put up with the rules, however, you’re in for a treat.

Chef Seiji Yamamoto doesn’t just cook, he beautifully arranges each dish like a work of art. Everything that emerges from the kitchen is especially tailored to the customer and made with the finest ingredients money can buy. In the winter, diners can look forward to fresh Matsuba snow crabs and in the summer, grilled ayu sweetfish among much more.

Opening Hours: Mon-Sat 18:00 - 01:00 (Closed on Sunday)
Address: Eisu Building, 7-17-24 Roppongi, Minato, Tokyo
Access: Roppongi Station
Phone Number: 03-3423-8006
Website: Nihonryori RyuGin
Price: >20,000 yen

Ginza Maru

Maru Ginza

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Now for a more down to earth option—Ginza Maru. There are no Michelin stars hung around its neck, nor an excess of glitz and glamour, but this kaiseki restaurant can still boast simple, fresh and delicious food that stands up well against its more lauded competitors. Plus, coming in at a very reasonable 5,500 yen, Ginza Maru won’t leave you surviving on plain rice for the remainder of your trip. There is a 600 yen table charge and drinks are pretty pricey but the whole experience still works out as more than affordable.

Opening Hours: Mon-Sat 11:30 - 14:00, 17:30 - 23:00 (Closed on Sunday)
Address: Ichigo Ginza612 Building 2F, 6-12-15 Ginza, Chuo, Tokyo
Access: Ginza Station
Phone Number: 03-5537-7420
Website: Ginza Maru
Price: Lunch 1,080 - 1,400 yen/Dinner 5,500 - 7,500 yen

Shokuzen Abe (喰善あべ)

Shokuzen Abe (喰善あべ)

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After a long day of shopping in Ginza, head on over to Shokuzen Abe, a Michelin star winning restaurant tucked away on the fourth floor of the Miyako Building. This cozy little restaurant only sits 11 customers at once, all of who are seated at the counter overlooking the chefs as they diligently prepare the food. If you pay special attention you’ll notice the kamado, a traditional Japanese stove used to prepare rice which the restaurant swears by.

Opening Hours: Mon-Sat 18:30 - 21:00 (Last Order/Closed on Sunday)
Address: Miyako Building 4F, 5-6-10 Ginza, Chuo, Tokyo
Access: Ginza Station
Phone Number: 03-3572-4855
Website: Shokuzen Abe (only in Japanese)
Price: 12,000 - 18,000 yen

Kyokaiseki Minokichi Tobu Ikebukuro Location

Kyokaiseki Minokichi Tobu Ikebukuro

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Minokichi has been serving the people of Kyoto since the 17th century. More recently, this pedigreed restaurant has opened branches across the country, including in Tokyo, where it can be found supplying Tokyoites with the finest Kyoto-style kaiseki money can buy.

A rarity in Japan, especially for a kaiseki restaurant, Minokichi offers a halal option free of pork and alcohol. The halal option is slightly more expensive than the regular kaiseki courses, however, it remains authentic and incredibly delicious. For a closer look, check out their halal menu.

Opening Hours: Mon-Sat 11:00 - 23:00/Sun 11:00 - 22:00
Address: Tobe Department Store 15F, 1-1-25 Nishi-Ikebukuro, Toshima, Tokyo
Access: Ikebukuro Station
Phone Number: 03-3980-8855
Website: Kyoto Cuisine Minokichi
Price: ~5,250 yen

Kudanshita Juhaku (九段下 寿白)

Kudanshita Juhaku (九段下 寿白)

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Choice and convenience, not to mention delicious food, are the selling points at Juhaku. This large restaurant (which also doubles as a tea room and bar) is ideal for parties and get-togethers, whether in the main restaurant or one of the tatami private rooms that are able to accommodate up to 60 people. The food, luckily, is bound to please everyone too. Juhaku serves sushi kaiseki, all prepared fresh by the sushi maestros behind the scenes. If you opt for a private room, you’ll even be assigned a personal sushi chef, who will be sure to put on a real show for your guests. If this all sounds like a bit much, drop by at lunchtime and pick up one of the restaurants brilliant bento boxes.

Opening Hours: Mon-Fri 11:30 - 14:30, 17:30 - 23:30/Sat 11:30 - 21:00 (Closed on Sunday)
Address: 1-4-1 Kudanminami, Chiyoda, Tokyo
Access: Kudanshita Station
Phone Number: 03-3222-0505
Website: Juhaka
Price: 3,990 - 42,000 yen

Ishikawa

Kagurazaka Ishikawa

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Located on a quiet backstreet in traditional Kagurazaka, this three Michelin star restaurant is headed by Hideki Ishikawa, a veteran chef always on the hunt for new ways to wow his customers.

Ishikawa’s food isn’t overly extravagant or over the top, simply packed with flavour and goodness. Ishikawa also listens to his customers’ preferences before he begins to cook, ensuring every last detail is perfect. Not a fan of uni (sea urchin)? Consider it gone. Everything used in the kitchen is also fresh, seasonal and sourced locally, so quality is guaranteed.

Opening Hours: Mon-Sat 17:30 - 24:00 (Closed on Sunday)
Address: Takamura Building, 5-37 Kagurazaka, Shinjuku, Tokyo
Access: Iidabashi Station
Phone Number: 03-5225-0173
Website: Kagurazaka Ishikawa
Price: ~22,000 yen

Kanidoraku Shinjuku Honten

Kanidoraku Shinjuku Honten

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Kanidoraku’s flagship store in Osaka has become somewhat of an icon in the city (thanks to the giant mechanical crab out front). The Tokyo branch, less so, though that’s not to say the food isn’t just as good. The crab-specialist offers six different kaiseki courses, ranging in price between 5,000 and 12,000 yen. So, while it’s not cheap, if you’re a crab connoisseur you won’t find too many places better. There’s even an all-you-can-drink option should you fancy it.

Opening Hours: Sun-Sat 11:30 - 23:00
Address: Tokyo Theater Building 7&8F, 3-14-20 Shinjuku, Shinjuku, Tokyo
Access: Shinjuku-Sanchome Station
Phone Number: 03-3352-0096
Website: Kanidoraku Shinjuku
Price: 3,000 - 11,000 yen

Tokyo Restaurants

For recommendations and advice on other Tokyo restaurants, check out our ultimate guide to Tokyo restaurants:

 

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