Tokyo Tempura – A Guide to The Best Tempura in Tokyo

A dish so simple, so delicious, so Japanese - tempura. Follow our guide to all things Tokyo tempura to find out where to get your hands on some of the city's best.

Photo Credit: OiMax via Flickr cc

Tempura is one of many fantastically delicious foods Japan has gifted the world, alongside other favourites like sushi and ramen. Vegetables, shrimp, clams, fish, all lathered in batter and deep fried, it is this simple formula that makes for a now classic of Japanese cuisine. Though tempura was traditionally considered a side dish, the boundless popularity of this crispy delicacy means it is now widely served as the main event. 

Keep reading to find out all you need to know about tempura in Tokyo, including, of course, our recommendations for the capital’s very best tempura restaurants.   

Tokyo Tempura Restaurant

Provided by Foursquare

References to tempura can be found back as far as the 17th century. Over the years, recipes and techniques have evolved and mutated, though today there is at least some agreement on the basics. Typically, restaurants use either vegetable oil or the more traditional sesame oil, with the ultimate goal being to keep the batter as light as possible. A fluffy but crunchy texture with minimal oiliness is the what all self-respecting tempura chefs aim for. 

Tokyo Tempura Price

Generally, tempura is not considered a cheap dish due to the fact that the premium ingredients (seafood especially) can be quite pricey, but, with thousands of Tokyo tempura restaurants out there, prices do vary. Luxurious tempura set meals can easily climb to 20,000 yen per person at a high-class restaurant. These set meals are impressively elaborate and include numerous side dishes like pickles, soups, rice and more. Usually, the chef in these restaurants will prepare each piece of tempura fresh for every customer after they’ve finished their previous serving. Customers thus get to watch the art of tempura come alive before their eyes, which, if you’ve never witnessed it before, can be quite thrilling. 

Tokyo Cheap Tempura

If your budget is low, however, don’t fret. There are chain stores that sell tempura and tendon (rice bowl topped with tempura) at low prices. Even though the ingredients aren’t quite to the same standard, the end results are still great. In Shibuya – among other places – you’ll find one of the only franchises selling all-you-can-eat (tabehoudai) tempura. Gachi offers unlimited tempura, with around 30 types of deep fried delicacies and many side dishes to choose from. Prices, amazingly, start at roughly 2,000 yen for two hours. Definitely worth a visit. 

Tokyo Tempura Menu

Provided by Foursquare

The most common type of tempura you’ll find in Tokyo is Edo-style tempura. Originating from Tokyo’s bay area, this style utilises a quick to make, chilled batter, which speeds up cooking times while retaining all the flavour of more complex versions. 

On a typical tempura restaurant menu, you’ll also notice a distinction between two different serving styles. One version, favoured by the classier restaurants, involves serving the tempura piece by piece, accompanied by sauces and side-dishes. The second, known as tendon, gives you your tempura all at once, atop a pile of rice. This style is generally cheaper. If you want to go all out, opt for the omakase option, in which the chef personally designs your meal. Expectedly, this is for those with more than few yen to spare. 

Ebi Tempura

Provided by Foursquare

Shrimp is suited perfectly to tempura; the light, crunchy crust of the batter and the soft chewy prawn complementing each other perfectly. Shrimp tempura has also become the cuisine’s calling card; the look of the battered shrimp being one of the most recognisable images of tempura going. 

Kakiage Tempura

Provided by Foursquare

Kakiage tempura is basically mixed tempura. A mixed bag of vegetables, seafood and whatever else are combined, battered and fried. In Japan, kakiage is often used as a neat – and delicious – way to use up spare ingredients. It’s quite popular and you’ll find it in most restaurants and tendon places.

Tendon

Provided by Foursquare

Tendon is a rice bowl, or donburi, with a tempura topping. This dish is quite popular as the rice provides sustenance and is a great partner to the deep fried vegetables and seafood. Usually, tendon comes with sauces and toppings to mix it up a little.

As you can see, there is an array of styles and places to choose from. Let us guide you to the best and tastiest tempura in Tokyo.

Best Tokyo Tempura Restaurants by Area

To find the best places for tempura in Tokyo, a good idea is to visit the areas in which it first became popular, like, for example, the bay area. Here, you’ll find a wide array of age-old traditional tempura joints, most of which retain the look and feel of their original incarnation. If you want the full tempura experience, this should be your first destination. 

Tempura bars, as the smaller places are known, are good for a few drinks, a lively atmosphere and tempura that doesn’t take itself too seriously. At the other end of the spectrum, the high-end luxury restaurants pride themselves on the quality of their finished product. While the vibe may not be as jovial, the tempura itself cannot be beaten. 

Restaurants of each kind can be found all over the city, though the below areas are among the best. 

Shinjuku Tempura

Shinjuku is a lively place littered with soaring office blocks, a famous red-light district, bars, restaurants, game centres, cinemas, karaoke houses, shopping malls and a whole lot more. You can find anything in Shinjuku, including, of course, tempura. 

Read more about what to enjoy in Shinjuku.

Tsunahachi Shinjuku

Provided by Foursquare

Tsunahachi’s main restaurant is in Shinjuku and is well worth a visit. It’s situated in one of the clusters of restaurants, bars and izakaya (Japanese pub) right beside Shinjuku Station and offers guests a warm atmosphere, delicious tempura and all the beer you can drink to wash it down with. Among the more inexpensive options for a tempura dinner in Tokyo but packed full of charm, it is a great little joint. The Tsunahachi Shinjuku tempura franchise also has locations in Ginza, as well as further afield in Hokkaido and Kyoto.

opening hours:    11.00 – 22.30

 closed over New Year (please see page for more information)

phone number:   03-3352-1012

­ Information Website

price:   ~ 4,000 yen

­ all major credit cards OK

address:    160-0022 Tokyo, Shinjuku, 3-31-8

Shinjuku-Sanchome Station (Tokyo Metro lines)

 

Funabashiya

Provided by Foursquare

Dating back to 1886, Funabashiya Tempura is a big name in the Tokyo tempura scene. The chain has another two branches in Tokyo: one close to Tokyo Station and another close to the Edo-Tokyo Museum in the east of the city. They offer excellent value on course meals, with prices starting at around 4,000 yen. If you go for the tendon or even just tempura by itself, your check will be around half that. Again, great tasting tempura for very reasonable prices.

­ opening hours:   11.40 – 22.00

 closed over New Year

phone number:   03-3354-2751

­ Information Website

price:   ~ 2,000 yen

­ all major credit cards OK

­ address:     Tokyo, Shinjuku, 3-28-14

Shinjuku Station (various JR and Metro lines)

 

Tenkou

Provided by Foursquare

Tenkou Tempura is a rather classy restaurant, serving up a whole host of delicious dishes and set meals. A course meal can be enjoyed in either a private room or at the counter, with the former adding 2,000 yen to the final price. For 18,000 yen you can enjoy a meal at the counter, in which you’ll be served up sashimi, 12 different types of tempura, side dishes, a rice-based tempura course and dessert. It’s a fantastic experience, but be sure to reserve seats to avoid disappointment. 

­ opening hours:   17.00 – 24.00 (weekdays), 11.30 – 22.00 (Saturdays)

 closed Sundays and holidays

phone number:   03-3269-1441

­ Official Website

price:   ~ 20,000 yen

­ major credit cards OK (VISA not accepted)

­ address:   162-0825 Tokyo, Shinjuku, Kagurazaka 3-1

Iidabashi Station (various JR and Tokyo Metro lines)

Ginza Tempura

Ginza, one of Tokyo’s glitzier districts, offers amazing high-end tempura, but at a price. Always be sure to check the prices before sitting down to avoid any nasty surprises when the check arrives. A few of the really famous places in Ginza are Tempura Kondo, Ten’ichi, Fukamachi and Abe, all of which can be found pretty close to each other between Ginza and Yurakucho Metro stations.

Read more about what to enjoy in Ginza.

Kondo Tempura

Provided by Foursquare

Kondo Tempura is special in that it uses a unique blend of oils to fry its tempura. The 2-star Michelin restaurant offers set meals and courses from around 11,000 yen up to 20,000 yen, but there are also single dishes available at much more budget-friendly prices. If you’re after somewhere for a special occasion, splurge on this place. The chef exclusively uses fresh seafood and locally grown seasonal vegetables, making the quality of the end product phenomenal. Reservations are a must if you want to be guaranteed a seat, especially if you’re in a larger group. If you need to cancel a reservation, do so as early as possible as cancellation fees apply. Also be aware that there may be no English speaker available. 

­ opening hours:   12.00 – 13.30 (lunch), 17.00 – 20.30 (dinner)

 closed on Sundays

­ phone number:   03-5568-0923

­ Information Website

price:   ~ 15,000 yen

­ all major credit cards OK

­ address:    Tokyo, Chuo, Ginza 5-5-13

Ginza Station (Tokyo Metro lines)

 

Tenichi

Provided by Foursquare

Tenichi’s fantastic dinner menu is available from 16:00, making it a great place to swing by after a shopping expedition. Tenichi’s course meals start at around 12,000 yen, with an additional 10% service charge on top. The lunch menu includes a tendon option, which comes in at roughly 4,500 yen. Tenichi is famous for its high-class dining experience and world-beating tempura. 

­ opening hours:   11.30 – 16.00 (lunch), 16.00 – 22.00 (dinner)

 closed on the 1st of January

­ phone number:   03-3571-1949

­ Official Website (JP only)

price:    ~ 15,000 yen

­ all major credit cards OK

­ address:    

Ginza Station (Tokyo Metro lines)

 

Ippoh Tempura Tokyo

Provided by Foursquare

Ippoh Tempura Tokyo sells Kamigata style tempura from the Osaka and Kyoto region in Japan. This means that rather than gomaabura (sesame oil), they use vegetable-based oils that are lighter in taste and leave behind a less intense flavour, a method which some say gives more of a starring role to the ingredients themselves. This lighter tempura is well-worth trying, especially for the budding tempura connoisseur. 

­ opening hours:   11.30 – 14.00 (lunch), 17.30 – 21.00 (dinner)

 11.30 – 20.00 (weekends and holidays)

phone number: ­  03-3289-5011

­ Official Website

price:   ~ 15,000 yen

­ all major credit cards OK

­ address:   104-0061 Tokyo, Chuo, Ginza 6-8-7

Ginza Station (Tokyo Metro lines)

 

Tempura Masa

Provided by Foursquare

Tempura Masa, like many of the more expensive places, doesn’t offer tanpin (single tempura dishes). The focus is on course meals, prepared fresh right in front of diners. Tokyo tempura menu prices vary greatly, but these types of set course meals are often quite similar in price. Tempura Masa’s set meals start at around 11,000 yen, going up to 17,000 yen for the omakase option. What makes Tempura Masa special is the fantastic venue and the demonstrable expertise of the chefs. 

­ opening hours:   11.30 – 14.00 (lunch), 17.00 – 21.30 (dinner)

 closed on Sundays and holidays

phone number:   03-3571-1380

­ Information Website

price:   ~ 13,000 yen

­ all major credit cards OK

­ address:   104-0061

Ginza and Shimbashi Station (various JR and Tokyo Metro lines)

 

Tempura Abe

Provided by Foursquare

Cheap tempura in Ginza may seem elusive, that is, until you discover Tempura Abe. Here, a kakiage bowl comes in at just 900 yen at lunchtime, in an area where a sub 1,000 yen meal is simply unheard of. Mr. Abe himself prepares all the food. Trained at the famous Nadaman over 30 years, his own venture guarantees just as much quality at a fraction of the price. If this sounds like the place for you, be sure to get there early as queues are not uncommon. 

­ opening hours:   11.30 – 14.00 (lunch), 17.00 – 21.00 (dinner)

 closed over New Year

phone number:   03-6228-6077

­ Information Website

price:   ~ 7,000 yen

­ all major credit cards OK

­ address:   

Ginza Station (Tokyo Metro lines)

Asakusa Tempura

Asakusa is steeped in history, including the history of tempura. Indeed, Kaminarimon Sansada is said to be the first shop anywhere to have offered tempura on its menu. Asakusa, therefore, is home to quite a number of tempura shops to choose from. 

For a more general look at Asakusa’s culinary landscape, take a look at our comprehensive Asakusa food guide

Tenya Tempura

Provided by Foursquare

Tenya is a famous Tokyo tempura franchise and the perfect place to start your tempura quest if you’ve never had the dish before. Their dishes are delicious and cheap – always a good combination. Their ingredients are quite traditional, mainly local vegetables and fresh seafood. They mainly offer tendon but you can get single dishes as well, should you want to leave out the rice. This chain store originated in Asakusa and has spread all over Tokyo and Japan (all the way up to Hokkaido).

­ opening hours:   11.00 – 23.00 (weekdays), 10.00 – 23.00 (Saturdays and holidays)

­ phone number:   03-5828-5918

­ Official Website

price:   ~ 1,000 yen

­ all major credit cards OK

­ address:   

Tawaramachi Station (Tokyo Metro Ginza Line)

 

Daikokuya Asakusa

Provided by Foursquare

Daikokuya in Asakusa is another one of those big names in Tokyo tempura. Founded in 1887, this place has history but nevertheless offers great value for money. Daikokuya Tempura doesn’t offer the elaborate set course meals available elsewhere, mainly tendon featuring their speciality dark fried tempura. This welcome addition to the tempura canon is created by frying jumbo shrimp in sesame oil until it takes on a dark golden brown colour, then complimented by the addition of a subtly spicy sauce to finish it off. Be sure to bring cash as credit cards are not accepted. 

­ opening hours:   11.10 – 20.30

 closed over New Year

­ phone number:   03-3844-1111

­ Information Website

price:   ~ 2,000 yen

­ cash only

­ address:   

Asakusa Station (Tokyo Metro lines)

 

Tempura Nakasei

Provided by Foursquare

You’ll find this gem inside a lovely traditional Japanese mansion, a location that gives it a very exclusive feel. Depending on the seat you choose – table or Japanese-style floor seating – the menu offered differs. Sit at a table and you’re free to choose individual dishes, all of which are set at pretty reasonable prices ( from around 3,000 yen). Opt for the Japanese-style seating, however, and you’re in for a course meal, which starts at roughly 7,500 yen for various plates of vegetables, pickles, sashimi, tempura, tendon and dessert. Be sure to make reservations. 

­ opening hours:   11.30 – 14.00 (lunch), 17.00 – 22.00 (dinner)

 closed Tuesdays and every 2nd and 4th Monday

­ phone number:   03-3841-4015

­ Official Website (JP only)

price:   ~ 10,000 yen

­ all major credit cards OK

­ address:   

Asakusa Station (Tokyo Metro lines)

 

Aoi Marushin Asakusa

Provided by Foursquare

Aoi Marushin Asakusa is a great place for tempura first-timers. They have plenty of options to choose from and the tempura itself is to an excellent standard. Aoi Marushin is not quite as pricey as many of the more fancy options in Asakusa, but they make some of the best tempura in Tokyo.

­ opening hours:   11.00 – 21.00

 closed over New Year

phone number:   03-3841-0110

­ Official Website (JP only)

price:   ~ 3,000 yen

­ all major credit cards OK

­ address:   

Asakusa Station (Tokyo Metro lines)

Tokyo Station Area Tempura (Chuo Ward)

The area around Tokyo Station is a mix of glass office towers, luxury hotels, parks and gardens, all set against the backdrop of the Sumida River and the Imperial Palace. It is an old district which has been developed a lot in recent years, lending it a great blend of old and new. Its restaurants cater to hungry office workers and tourists alike, meaning there is a great variety of places to choose from.  

Tempura Nakayama

Provided by Foursquare

The speciality tendon dish served up here stars ‘black tempura’, made by adding a special sauce to the tempura after it has been fried. The sauce is deceptively light, complimenting the crispiness of the tempura nicely. Additionally, Tempura Nakayama is very fairly priced and perfect for either lunch or dinner.

­ opening hours:   11.15 – 13:00 (lunch), 17.30 – 21.00 (dinner)

 may close early when ingredients are used up

phone number:   03-3661-4538

­ Information Website

price:   ~ 2,000 yen

­ cash advised

­ address:    Tokyo, Chuo, Nihonbashi Ningyocho 1-10-8

Ningyocho or Suitengu-Mae Station (Tokyo Metro lines)

 

Kaneko Hannosuke

Provided by Foursquare

This particular store of the Kaneko Hannosuke tempura franchise exclusively sells tendon. Keneko Hannosuke has stores all over Japan and the US, most offering a much more extensive menu. This branch’s specialisation stems from the story of Kaneko Shinya, the son of the chain’s founder, who discovered a forgotten tendon recipe, developed it, and came up with the dish you’ll find here today. Try it out and discover what all the fuss is about. 

­ opening hours:   11.00 – 22.00

 closed over New Year

phone number:   03-6262-3734

­ Official Website

price:   ~ 2,000 yen

­ cash advised

­ address:   103-0023 Tokyo, Chuo, Nihonbashi Muromachi 1-11-15

Mitsukoshimae Station (Tokyo Metro)

 

Tenmatsu

Provided by Foursquare

This adorable little tempura bar in Nihonbashi has a really traditional Japanese feel to it. The bar-style seating allows diners a front-row view of the chefs at work, which is always impressive. Whilst not particularly cheap, the experience is wonderful, making it well-worth a visit. Dinner service finishes fairly early, so get there early. 

­ opening hours:   11.00 – 14.00 (lunch) – 17.00 – 21.00 (dinner)

 open year round

­ phone number:   03-3241-5840

­ Official Website

price:   ~ 10,000 yen

­ all major credit cards OK

­ address:   

Nihombashi Station (Tokyo Metro lines)

Minato Ward Tempura (Akasaka, Roppongi, Minamiaoyama)

Tokyo’s harbour area is where tempura originally developed into the dish it is today. Little restaurants and stands still exist today, dotted about the area, but only a select few are original. These restaurants take great pride in their heritage and are as much a history lesson as a meal (in a good way). Check out some of the best. 

Motoyoshi Tempura

Provided by Foursquare

This place is a good choice for a set meal in a classy environment. Motoyoshi Tempura requires a reservation, but, for your organisation, you’ll be rewarded with a show of tempura artistry from the master chefs and some of the best tempura you’re likely to find anywhere. Lunch is not available at this restaurant, but the opening hours are long, so you could always opt for a late lunch in the early evening. 

­ opening hours:   17.30 – 24.00 (L.O. 23.00)

 closed on Sundays and Mondays

phone number:   03-3401-0722

­ Official Website (JP only)

price:   ~ 15,000 yen

­ all major credit cards OK

­ address:   

Gaiemmae Station (Tokyo Metro Ginza Lines)

 

Tempura Yamanoue Kanda

Provided by Foursquare

This restaurant is part of the Hilltop Hotel (Yamanoue) located in the Midtown Garden Terrace complex, right beside the Midtown Gardens and the Ritz Carlton Tokyo in Roppongi. The fabulous location and beautiful venue is the perfect setting in which to enjoy the Edo-style tempura on offer here. There are several options available for lunch, though for dinner only one: a 9,000 yen set meal which has been lovingly curated by the expert chefs. The original location of this restaurant is in the Kanda district of the city, but this offshoot is just as good. 

­ opening hours:   11.00 – 14.00 (lunch), 17.00 – 22.00 (dinner)

opening hours:  11.00 – 22.00 (Saturday), 11.00 – 21.00 (Sunday)

phone number:   03-5413-3577

­ Official Website

price:   ~ 12,000 yen

­ all major credit cards OK

­ address:   , Tokyo Midtown Garden Terrace

Roppongi and Nogizaka Station

 

Miyakawa

Provided by Foursquare

Miyakawa offers guests the lighter Osaka style tempura, giving you the opportunity to compare and contrast with the more usual Edo style. Lunch is fairly inexpensive and dinner is reasonable, so if you’re looking for a rather light version of tempura, definitely consider Miyakawa. Located on Omotesando, it’s also quite centrally located and thus easily accessible. 

Check out more things to see on Omotesando and what to do in the adjacent Harajuku area.

­ opening hours:   11.30 – 14.00 (lunch), 17.00 – 21.00 (dinner)

 closed on Sundays and holidays

phone number:   03-3400-3722

­ Information Website

price:   ~ 7,000 yen

­ cash advised

­ address:   

Omotesando Station (Tokyo Metro lines)

 

Tenshige

Provided by Foursquare

Tenshige is another place to go for the sesame oil, dark fried version of tempura. Specialising in tendon, this lovely little place is very Japanese in style and offers a great experience for tourists in Akasaka, one of Tokyo’s more business orientated districts. The food here is great. Its original taste is said to be closer to home cooking than in many other places, recalling, for many, the flavour of the Showa period. The opening hours are slightly unusual, as they don’t really open for dinner, but if you come early you can catch a meal before they close at 19:00.

opening hours:   11.00 – 19.00

phone number:   03-3584-3746

­ Information Website

price:   ~ 2,000 yen

­ cash advised

­ address:   107-0052 Tokyo, Minato, Akasaka 3-6-10

Akasaka and Tameike-Sanno Station (Tokyo Metro lines)

 

Tempura Mikawa Roppongi

Provided by Foursquare

Tempura Mikawa is a fabulous little place with a cool, contemporary interior and scrumptious food. The tempura here is light, crispy and well worth the 13,000 yen price tag. For lunch, the tendon option, starting at around 3,800 yen, is the best bet. Authentic Edo style tempura in a classy setting? Definitely.

opening hours:   ­ 11.30 – 14.00 (lunch), 17.30 – 21.30 (dinner)

 closed on Wednesdays

phone number:   03-3423-8100

­ Information Website

price:   ~ 15,000 yen

­ all major credit cards OK

­ address:   106-0032 Tokyo, Minato, Roppongi 6-12-2

Roppongi and Nogizaka Station (Tokyo Metro lines)

Shibuya Tempura

Shibuya, one of the capital’s most vibrant hubs, isn’t to be left out of any tempura gourmet’s agenda. You’ll find in Shibuya some Ginza and Asakusa based tempura franchises, Ten’ichi and Tenya, for example, as well as one very special tempura restaurant all of its own: Gachi. 

Read more about what to enjoy in Shibuya.

Gachi

Provided by Foursquare

All-you-can-eat tempura is rare, so be sure to savour it here. Although a franchise, the Gachi in Shibuya is the biggest and best and where your unlimited tempura fantasies can become reality. Starting at just 3,000 yen for two hours, prices are more than fair, and, if you’re in the mood, you can even add an all-you-can-drink option, too. 

­ opening hours:   17.00 – 23.30 (weekdays), 12.00 – 23.30 (weekends)

phone number:   03-5428-4710

­ Information Website

price:   ~ 3,000 yen

­ all major credit cards OK

­ address:   150-0042 Tokyo, Shibuya, Udagawacho 28-1

Roppongi and Nogizaka Station (Tokyo Metro lines)

Find the Best Tokyo Tempura Restaurants with Tabelog

Tabelog is a Japanese restaurant review site which has become an invaluable source of information for budding gourmets. Grouping restaurants by food type or area, Tabelog gives users a full rundown of the best restaurants out there. 

We’ve trawled through Tabelog so you don’t have to, all in search of finding the best tempura restaurant for you. See what we discovered, below. 

Check out tabelog at tabelog.com

Mikawa Zezankyo

Provided by Foursquare

This restaurant’s reputation proceeds it. So it should, the food here is fantastic and the ambience relaxed. Lunch is around 10,000 yen while dinner comes in at roughly double that. It might be a bit far off the beaten track, but Mikawa Zezankyo is definitely worth a visit if you want an authentic, no-nonsense tempura experience.

Tabelog Review

With an average of 4.3 out of 5 starts on Tabelog, this place is near perfect. The restaurant does come in for some criticism for its location, but these minor grumbles pale in comparison to the positives. 

­ opening hours:   11.30 – 13.30 (lunch), 17.00 – 21.00 (dinner)

 closed on Wednesdays

­ phone number:   03-3643-8383

­ Official Website

Tabelog Link

price:   ~20,000 yen

­ all major credit cards OK

­ address:    Tokyo, Minato, Azabujuban 2-5-11

Monzen-Nakacho Station (Tokyo Metro Tozai Line)

 

Takiya Tempura

 

A photo posted by RINAPI🐷❤️25 (@rii1108) on

This great place is another one that comes with a bit of a price tag but is ultimately well worth it. The tempura here is unquestionably delicious and the ambience, service and surroundings are perfect for anything from a business meeting to a party. 

Tabelog Review

With an average of 4.43 stars out of 5, this is another highly ranked tempura joint. Users praise the classy surroundings and the location right next to the Roppongi Hills complex. 

­ opening hours:   17.30 – 22.00

 holidays irregular, please check with the shop beforehand

phone number:   03-6804-1732

­ Tabelog Link

price:   ~ 20,000 yen

­ JCB and AMEX credit cards OK

­ address:   

Azabu Juban Station (Tokyo Metro Tozai Line)

 

Seiju Tempura

Provided by Foursquare

Right beside Tsukiji Fish Market, the largest of its kind in Japan, you’ll find Seiju tempura: a great little restaurant with delicious dishes utilising only the freshest ingredients and a functional but charming interior. This restaurant is a bit out of the way of central Tokyo so best reached by Metro or taxi. 

Tabelog Review

Seiju racks up an impressive 4.07 stars out of 5. All in all, the food is described as delicious, while the negative commenters mainly focussed on the steep prices for a meal and drinks. 

­ opening hours   11.30 – 13.30 (lunch), 18.00 – 21.00 (dinner)

 closed on Sundays and Mondays

phone number   03-3546-2622

­ Tabelog Link

­ cash advised (no credit cards/debit cards)

­ address   Tokyo, Bunkyo, Sekiguchi 1-23-6

Tsukishishijo, Higashi-Ginza and Shintomicho Station (Tokyo Metro lines)

 

Fukamachi Tempura

Provided by Foursquare

Tempura Fukamachi is not far from the Imperial Palace in Tokyo’s Chuo Ward. It’s famous for its commitment to preserving authentic flavours and their special tentsuyu (tempura dipping sauce) made with bonito, kombu, mirin and soy sauce. Fukamachi’s head chef was trained at the Hilltop Hotel for over 30 years and is a master of his craft, adept at handpicking only the best ingredients for his diners. 

Tabelog Review

Fukamachi Tempura is evidently very consistent, scoring an impressive 4.35 out of 5. Some reviewers even commented that they felt the meal was too cheap! If you’d like this to be you, head there for lunch, when you’ll get the biggest bargains. Strangely, there was also some criticism that some of the courses were a little too simple to justify the price. 

­ opening hours:   11.30 – 14.00 (lunch), 17.00 – 21.00 (dinner)

 closed 1st and 3rd Sundays and Mondays

phone number:   03-5250-8777

­ Tabelog Link

price:   ~ 15,000 yen

­ cash advised

­ address:    Tokyo, Chuo, Kyobashi 2-5-2

Kyobashi and Takaracho Station

 

Tensen

Provided by Foursquare

This shop also sells old-school tempura, but at a lower price. Specialising in shrimp tempura, only the best will do for the chefs here. The dinner menu starts at around 4,500 yen whilst a tendon at lunchtime comes in at roughly 1,000 yen.  

Tabelog Review

With a 3.52 on average, Tensen is a rated as consistently above average. The tendon specifically is very popular with guests. The location does come in for some criticism but overall, the price and quality win out.  

­ opening hours:   11.30 – 13.30 (lunch), 18.00 – 21.00 (dinner)

 closed on Sundays and Mondays

phone number:   03-5261-2751

­ Tabelog Link

price:   ~ 7,000 yen

­ cash advised

­ address:  Tokyo, Bunkyo, Sekiguchi 1-23-6

Edogawabashi Station (Tokyo Metro Yurakucho Line)

Tokyo Travel

Want more from Tokyo? What to see, what to do, what to eat and all the vital info? Compathy Magazine has everything you need and more:

More on Tokyo from Compathy Magazine. 

Share Your Experiences 

Samantha Khairallah

Samantha Khairallah

Originally from Switzerland, currently studying in Tokyo. With a wide array of interests, including travel, I'm passionate about what I write here at Compathy Magazine.



Related travel categories

# Tokyo Restaurants # What to Eat in Japan

Recommended articles

Related Posts