Asakusa Shopping – Top 12 Shopping Spots in Asakusa

Every Tokyo tourist loves Asakusa and it's not hard to see why. Shopping is one of the area's main draws and with our Asakusa shopping guide you'll be navigating the district's best spots in no time at all.

Photo Credit: chee.hong via Flickr cc

Photo Credit: chee.hong via Flickr cc

One of Tokyo’s oldest districts, Asakusa is an area of the city that simply cannot be missed out from any Tokyo itinerary. Once the city’s premier entertainment district, it is now a place for soaking up the look and feel of the Edo-era in the winding streets, spectacular temples and abundant shops, restaurants and cafes. 

Souvenir shopping is one of Asakusa’s principal attractions, and it is easy to see why. Everything from traditional crafts, food and drink to the latest in cutting edge tech can be found here, making it the best place to pick up a memento or a gift for your loved ones back home. To help you out, we’ve gone to the trouble of putting together a comprehensive guide to the best shopping spots in Asakusa. In one of our 12 hand-picked shopping spots you’re sure to find something that fits. Take a look. 

For a more general guide to Japanese souvenirs, take a look here. We’ve also got you covered for the best places to stay in Asakusa as well as the very best restaurants in this most traditional of neighbourhoods. 

1. Nakamise Shopping Street

Provided by Foursquare

Provided by Foursquare

One of Asakusa’s most famed (and busiest) shopping streets leading up to the wonderful Senso-Ji Temple, Nakamise Street is a relatively narrow pedestrian stretch lined with an almost overwhelming volume of small shops and stalls selling everything any Japanophile could ever wish for. Trinkets, clothes, novelty items, traditional street food and snacks, sweets, handicrafts, fabric and a whole lot more are all up for grabs on Nakamise. The best part is, when you finally reach the street’s end, you’re confronted with one of the country’s best-loved temples in all its glory. As said, the street gets pretty busy, especially on weekends, but don’t let that put you off, there is a reason for its popularity. 

­ 10:00 – 17:00

 Shop opening hours vary     

­ 03-3844-3350

­ 1-36-3 Asakusa, Taito, Tokyo

 Asakusa Station

­ Official Website

2. Kappabashi Street

Provided by Foursquare

Provided by Foursquare

Spot the huge moustachioed chef’s head peering out into the distance and you’ll know you’ve arrived on Kappabashi Street. Located between Asakusa and Ueno, this 800-meter road is home to a massive 170 different shops, all specialising in kitchen goods. Oddly enough, Kappabashi Street has become one of Asakusa’s main tourist draws, with scores of eager visitors strolling up and down the street daily, ducking into every shop that peaks their interest. If you’re after some reasonably priced traditional pottery, kitchen utensils, sake or tea sets, chopsticks or knives (among much else) you won’t leave disappointed. 

­ 09:00 – 17:00

 Closed over New Year     

­ 03-3844-1225

­ 3-18-2 Matsugaya, Taito, Tokyo

 Tawaramachi Station

­ Official Website

3. Shin-Nakamise Shopping Street

Provided by Foursquare

Provided by Foursquare

Parallel to Nikamise Street but somehow overlooked by the majority of visitors to the area, Shin-Nikimase is a covered shopping arcade packed with shops and eateries. Sheltered from the elements and lacking the intimidating crowds of elsewhere but just as comprehensive in terms of the range of goods on offer, this is a place for the savvy shopper. Bargain prices on all the classic souvenir items can be dug up on Shin-Nikimase so be sure not to miss it. 

­ 09:00 – 20:00                                 

 Asakusa Station

­ 3-18-2 Matsugaya, Taito, Tokyo

­ Official Website

4. Asakusa Underground Shopping Mall

Provided by Foursquare

Provided by Foursquare

Tokyo’s oldest underground mall, the succinctly named Asakusa Underground Mall is a low-ceilinged, slightly cramped and bedraggled shopping mall which we wouldn’t change for the world. Wandering around is a refreshing taste of stripped back Tokyo without confection or glitz but with bags of charm. The 20 or so shops sell all manner of traditional food and souvenir items, plus, if the mood strikes you, you can even pop in for a massage or to get your fortune told. The entrance, a set of stairs in front of the Ekimise shopping mall, can be pretty hard to find the first time so don’t panic if it takes you a few minutes to strike gold. Definitely one for the off-beat shopper. 

 Asakusa Station (Exit 8)

­ 1-4-1 Hanakawado, Taito, Tokyo

 5. Asakusa Don Quijote

Provided by Foursquare

Provided by Foursquare

Your flight is tomorrow and you’ve somehow forgotten to buy souvenirs? Don’t worry. Don Quijote, a tax-free, mega-discount chain located all over Japan is your lifeline. Asakusa’s branch is huge, each of its seven floors crammed from floor to ceiling with everything from food, drink and sensible household items to crazy costumes, tech you never thought you needed until now and so much more. Compared to other Don Quijote’s in Tokyo, the Asakusa store is pretty spacious and easy to navigate, so it’s definitely worth putting on your list. 

­ Open 24/7                                      

­ 03-5826-2511

­ 10-2-20 Asakusa, Taito, Tokyo

­ Official Website

6. Asakusa Hisago-Dori

Provided by Foursquare

Provided by Foursquare

Situated between Asakusa Station and Hanayashiki Amusement Park, Hisago-dori has long been one of Asakusa’s premier shopping and trading streets and continues to be so today. Find here restaurants and over 50 shops selling traditional items such as kimonos, geta (trad. wooden sandals) and tempting Japanese confection (wagashi). Popular with discerning locals and in-the-know domestic tourists, Hisago-dori may be a good bet if Nakimise isn’t your thing. 

­ 11:00 – 18:00

 Opening hour can vary    

­2-14-13 AsakusaTaito, Tokyo

­ Official Website (Japanese)                  

7. Asakusa Denbouin-Dori

Provided by Foursquare

Provided by Foursquare

Just on from Nakamise Street, Denbouin-dori is a wider shopping street with a far more relaxed feel to it. Built up in the 1950s, the street retains a certain Showa-era charm. The best things on offer here include sought-after kiriko (cut glass), handmade Japanese fans and antiques aplenty. The items on offer here are of a visibly higher quality than in some spots so you may have to pay a premium, but it may just be worth it in the long run. 

­ 1-37-8 Asakusa, Taito, Tokyo       

­ Official Website (Japanese) 

8. Okuyama Omairimachi

Provided by Foursquare

Provided by Foursquare

Once the epicentre of Asakusa’s entertainment industry, Okuyama Omairimachi of old would have been the place to spot some Geisha, catch some street performances or head to the theatre. Today, the focus is more on shopping, though the Mokuba-kan Public Theater keeps the flame alive with regular performances and events. Unsurprisingly, goods found on this street are largely theatrical in nature, including traditional theatre masks and props, as well as shutter paintings and sculptures. 

­ 2-7-3 Asakusa, Taito, Tokyo     

­ Official Website (Only Japanese) 

9. Asakusa Nishi-Sando Shopping Street

Provided by Foursquare

Provided by Foursquare

Just west of Senso-Ji Temple find Asakusa Nishi-sando, a long, covered shopping street packed with unique souvenir items. Renovated in 2014, the street has a great feel to it and is ever popular with savvy shoppers. Original souvenirs from samurai swords and artisan crafts to weird food and snacks are on offer here, all at pretty reasonable prices. 

­ Hours vary

  Closed over New Year   

­ 2-7-13 Asakusa, Taito, Tokyo      

­ Official Website (Japanese)      

10. Orange-Dori shopping street

Provided by Foursquare

Provided by Foursquare

Even streets can have mascots in Japan, Orange-Dori is proof of this. Let Orente-kun guide you down this beautifully paved street lined with upmarket stores selling Japanese crafts, furniture, accessories and clothes, porcelain and antiques. Throughout the year Orange-Dori is also host to various events, from samurai performances to star-studded award ceremonies, making it one of Asakusa’s more lively shopping streets. 

­ Opening hours depends on shops    

 Asakusa Station

­ 1-21-6 Asakusa, Taito, Tokyo              

­ Official Website (Japanese)

11. ROX Shopping Mall

Provided by Foursquare

Provided by Foursquare

The largest of its kind in Asakusa, ROX is a huge shopping complex with hundreds of shops and restaurants spread over its many floors. In the basement find a food court, whilst upstairs chain stores such as Uniqlo, Daiso and Seiyu ply their trade alongside smaller shops. Also find here a 24-hour supermarket, a sento (public bath) and even a swimming pool! If you want everything in once place, ROX is your best bet. 
 

­ 10:30 – 21:00

 Most major credit cards accepted

­ 03-3844-1225

­ 1-25-15 Asakusa, Taito, Tokyo

 Asakusa Station

­ Official Website 

12. Ekimise

Provided by Foursquare

Provided by Foursquare

Ekimise, literally “station stores”, is a sprawling modern mall located within Asakusa Station itself. Right in the heart of the action, Ekimise is great for everything from day-to-day items to souvenirs and novelties. The rooftop viewing platform is a particularly nice spot from which to take in the whole of Asakusa and the many restaurants and cafes are perfect for a break from the hustle and bustle of the streets outside. 

­ 10:00 – 20:00

  Most major credit cards accepted    

­ 03-6802-8633

­ 1-4-1 Hanakawado, Taito, Tokyo

Asakusa Station (Exit A7)

­ Official Website

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Ines Smaili

Ines Smaili

Hi, I'm Inès, I love to travel all around the world especially in Japan, I will share with you all the information needed to have the best trip of your life!



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